Yesenia Thibault-Picazo

Recent St. Martins ‘Textile Futures’ graduate Yesenia Thibault-Picazo’s project Craft in the Anthropocene, an imagined future geology based on many more thousands of years of our activity and impact upon the make-up of the earth…

I’d love to get my hands on a copy of the accompanying thesis-book she’s produced, it’s a really enviable object, well conceived and so very beautifully designed. 

(Source: yeseniatp.com)

http://www.grimmgallery.com/artists/charles-avery/

the strange island-world of Charles Avery




These three versions of the same image taken by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity illustrate different choices that scientists can make in presenting the colors recorded by the camera. The left image is the raw, unprocessed color, as it is received directly from Mars. The center rendering was produced after calibration of the image to show an estimate of “natural” color, or approximately what the colors would look like if we were to view the scene ourselves on Mars. The right image shows the result of then applying white-balancing, which shows an estimate of the colors of the terrain as if illuminated under Earth-like, rather than Martian, lighting. 
The image was taken by the Mastcam on Sol 19 of Curiosity’s mission on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012), using only the camera’s red-green-blue Bayer filters. It looks south-southwest from the rover’s landing site toward Mount Sharp. 



http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16800.html
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/

These three versions of the same image taken by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity illustrate different choices that scientists can make in presenting the colors recorded by the camera. The left image is the raw, unprocessed color, as it is received directly from Mars. The center rendering was produced after calibration of the image to show an estimate of “natural” color, or approximately what the colors would look like if we were to view the scene ourselves on Mars. The right image shows the result of then applying white-balancing, which shows an estimate of the colors of the terrain as if illuminated under Earth-like, rather than Martian, lighting. 

The image was taken by the Mastcam on Sol 19 of Curiosity’s mission on Mars (Aug. 23, 2012), using only the camera’s red-green-blue Bayer filters. It looks south-southwest from the rover’s landing site toward Mount Sharp. 


http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/multimedia/pia16800.html

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/raw/

lovevoltaireusapart:

John Divola, “As Far as I Could Get (10 Seconds)” 1996-97

(via lesleymargaritarivera)

Taca Sui

Percy Smith, 1909

(Source: Slate)

(Source: blakegopnik)

Mark Wyse

(interviewed by Shane Lavalette)

http://www.shanelavalette.com/journal/2007/10/14/contemporary-dialogues-mark-wyse/

SL: What is it about cognitive science that interests you?

MW: I stumbled upon this guy Thomas Metzinger, a philosopher in cognitive studies who talks about the “self” and transparency. While perusing Amazon.com I came across this quote: “Nobody ever was or had a self. All that ever existed were conscious self-models that could not be recognized as models.” Now I thought to myself, “That’s interesting, but what the fuck? What does that mean?” So I bought his book Being No One: The Self Model Theory of Subjectivity. Beyond the first paragraph, I don’t have a clue as to what the book is about or how he came to think that the self doesn’t exist. But this idea of the “self” being an illusion I found fascinating. Fascinating in that I didn’t know what exactly he meant by not having a self but could relate to it from the perspective that you can never really see yourself or understand yourself from the position of being yourself. I believe this is why we do things, make things, talk about things; it is this never-ending drive to understand our own relationship to reality.

SL: Would you say this is why we find ourselves making photographs?

MW: Yes, exactly. Art becomes a model of our relationship to reality. For myself photography is a good model because it engages the intentional and the unintentional, with things in your control and outside your control, it deals with yourself and the other.

I find this relationship highly compelling.

goldenfever:

katherine wolkoff, deer bed, 2007

goldenfever:

katherine wolkoff, deer bed, 2007